Asano Agarie-Gomez

Puzzle
Vinyl and cotton fabric
5.5 x 7 ft., 2020

An intricate single pattern unfolds in two and yet is still connected. The colors behind the puzzle pieces create a second layer that conceals this dual ( negative - positive ) nature of the design. Puzzle speaks of the absence of departed loved ones, making this delicate connection visible yet sometimes hard to see in the colorful reality of everyday life. 


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Follow the River
Vinyl film on linen
70 in x 23 ft., 2020

Silvery transparent fish shapes move to the sway of fabric, casting pink and blue shadows on the water and spaces around the installation. An underwater sensation is simulated above ground, quite literally illuminating what goes on beneath the surface. A school of fish speaks of the togetherness of a tribe or social group: it highlights the absence we have all experienced during the period of social isolation due to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Cecilia Andre

Mariana Tonini Vilas Boas

January 22 through April 4

The annual AnkhLave Garden Project is a fellowship where six Queens-based Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) artists create installations in a natural community space as an alternative studio and exhibition space. For the 2nd annual Fellowship, six female artists of color with immigration journeys to the US had the unique challenge of creating and displaying their work in a natural environment. This resulted in a public art show that ran through summer 2020. Now, months later, they come together again, displaying relics from the initial exhibit along with new and continued explorations that are in conversation with the original public works. To learn about the initial outdoor exhibit click HERE.

This exhibit is made possible by the Queens Council on the Arts with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the New York City Council.

Christine Sloan Stoddard

Untitled

Acrylic over a wood canvas, pussy willow branches, rope
2021

This painting is a reflection about those who suffer from poverty and violence in Brazil. Because of polarization of politics, the move away from social benefits for the population, and most recently the pandemic, people are being forced to do extraordinary things to survive. 

The sparrows represent the people of Brazil. Sparrows are a common bird, brought to the Americas by conquistadores. In the painting, one lone sparrow flies out, moving away from a broken branch. The other birds are static, unaware of the disturbance nearby. The broken branches go trough the painting, trapping and growing around the sparrows. The red is a reference to revolution, and blood.

Flores de Femicidio/ Víctimas de Enero 2019 
Femicide Florals / Víctimas from January 2019

Cyanotype on watercolor paper, glue, wire and string
size variable , 2019-2021

My most recent project Flores de Femicidio examines gender-based violence against women in Argentina. Flores de Femicidio investigates and documents the rising numbers of femicides occurring in Argentina during the entire year of 2019. Each cyanotype flower represents a specifc victim of femicide, who is memorialized with a label that honors each woman by her name. This installation is currently in the works and continues to grow as the numbers of femicides continue to increase. The entire years worth of flowers (327) is to be completed in 2021 with QCA New Works Grant.

Natali Bravo-Barbee


Imprint of Summer
Mixed media on Mylar
90” (H) x 36”(W) 2 pieces, 2021

Last summer I exhibited these pieces on the Green Roof here in the Queens Botanical Garden among the wild plants by the sun roof for the auditorium.

Now 3 feet long piece is placed vertically, overwrapping 2 images with light coming through, following the course of light, reflecting water.


Marielle Presente!
Acrylic on Canvas, branches, and rope, 2020

This portrait of Marielle Franco is an homage to her life and work. Marielle was murdered on March 14th, 2018 while returning from a speech. She was a politician, a feminist, and human rights activist fighting against police brutality in Brazil. 

The portrait instalation was amids the crabapple trees. These trees are common and are not special, however together they have a force, like when people come together to fight for justice. Marielle represents that living force, like a tree seed that will grow, and her fight will live on. She is present.

 

Angel’s Garden 
Artificial leaves, fabric, metal wires, ink, angel ornament, PVC film 
H 81.5 x W 36 x D 25, 2021

I accomplish this by creating a piece which mimics nature while using artificial materials and bright colors in order to investigate the concept of “otherness” in relation to the garden environment. The juxtaposition between my use of the artificial and the garden environment highlights both the differences and commonality between the natural environment and the human creative experience. 

 

Rabbit’s Treasure
Mixed media assemblage
30”x12”x6”, 2021

This piece is part of my ongoing “Rabbit Royalty” series, a work in progress that reclaims the othering expression “They breed like rabbits.” This expression is often used to degrade minority groups, often immigrant ones, for having larger than average families or “overpopulating” a place in the speaker’s view. As a child, my siblings and I would retreat from such xenophobic comments through fantasy. This box is meant to replicate a child’s imagining of what a rabbit king’s treasure might look like—floating, taunting, enchanting—along with its companion nonsensical treasure map. The box contains remnants from “Rabbit’s Storytelling Throne,” which was displayed outdoors at the Queens Botanical Garden (Summer 2020).

KAYO SHIDO​

The Rabbit King with a remnant of “Rabbit’s Storytelling Throne (bunny gate detail), 
Acrylic on canvas; mixed media on found wood
30”x40”, 2020


This piece is part of my ongoing “Rabbit Royalty” series, a work in progress that reclaims the othering expression “They breed like rabbits.” This expression is often used to degrade minority groups, often immigrant ones, for having larger than average families or “overpopulating” a place in the speaker’s view. As a child, my siblings and I would retreat from such xenophobic comments through fantasy. “The Rabbit King” is a child-like portrait of a bunny monarch, full of pride—not shame—for his kingdom.


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"On the Inside Looking Out" by the 2020 AnkhLave Garden Project Fellows

Unbalanced  Burden
Mixed media on Mylar
10’ (H) x 5’(W) x 4’(D), 2021

Last summer I exhibited on the Green Roof here in the Queens Botanical Garden, “Dry Garden” inspired by the Japanese “Karesansui”.

During the completion of the work at home, I have witnessed the incomparable unbalance of burden on essential workers in New York. I wanted to express the unbearable weight on them, with gratitude from the bottom of my heart. Small rock is holding such an enormous burden. Thank you for your courage to serve.


Flying Fish (Diptych)
Acrylic paint on polyester film and cellophane

78 x 36”, 2021

Flying iridescent fish at pedestrian eye level populate the windows and create shadows as sunlight filters through. The image suggests community and moving forwards, as the fish is a creature that only swims forwards, never backwards. 


Bunny Gate (Rabbit’s Storytelling Throne detail)
Mixed media assemblage
48”x36”, 2021

This piece is part of my ongoing “Rabbit Royalty” series, a work in progress that reclaims the othering expression “They breed like rabbits.” This expression is often used to degrade minority groups, often immigrant ones, for having larger than average families or “overpopulating” a place in the speaker’s view. As a child, my siblings and I would retreat from such xenophobic comments through fantasy.  “Rabbit’s Storytelling Throne” was a magical hideout meant to replicate the “castles” and “forts” we built to escape from bullies and gossip while elevating rabbits to powerful, magical beings full of their own stories. The bunny gate is one remnant of this outdoor installation at the Queens Botanical Garden (Summer 2020).